Old Geezer Doodles Folk Art

SHOWCASE #5 Ships and nautical scenes

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Just doodling. This is the way it looks in the straits and other narrow passages on the seas around the world. Ships and boats are coming and going from all different directions and it sometimes looks like mass confusion. To complicate the situation, many of the ships ignore the standard rules of the road for the high seas. To avoid disaster, a ship must be under the control of an experienced competent and stable pilot when operating in these conditions.

Maine mariner

Just doodling.

 

UNDER FULL SAIL

Just doodling. A tall sailing ship glides across a sea as smooth as glass.

 

 

 

Just doodling.

 

 

COMING HOME

Just doodling.

 

 

GOING ALOFT

Just doodling. The able bodied seamen on the old sailing ships were their main work force and kept the wind in the sails. These were strong and agile young men who were fearless and brave. They spent most of their time climbing around aloft in the riggings, in all kinds of weather, making adjustments to keep the sails trimmed and filled.

 

KEY PEOPLE ON A TALL SAILING SHIP

Just doodling. The Captains needed several key people to assist them when making sea voyages. These men signed on for the term of a voyage and were responsible directly to the Captain. The bluejackets were utilized as necessary by these assistants.

 

CAPTAIN IN HIS CHAIR

Just doodling. The Captain or Master had absolute control over all of the men on his ship. He was also responsible for everything that happened on his ship. That remains true today.

 

SEAFARING ARTIFICER

Just doodling. On the sailing ships, older men were the articifers and craftsmen. They lacked the strength and stamina to work the sails and do the heavy lifting on deck but had valuable experience and skills that were needed on the ships. They worked in shops as sailmakers, cobblers, tailors, leather carvers, macramé artists and other specialties. They were talented and highly skilled men and produced items of excellent quality. Many of those items can still be seen in nautical museums around the world.

MANNING THE CROW'S NEST

Just doodling. On the sailing ships, the crow's nest was a perchlike platform atop a main mast forward. It provided space for one man and was equipped with a bell so the watch there could send out an audible alert. It was manned when the Captain deemed it necessary.

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CAPTAIN IN HIS CHAIR

Just doodling. The Captain or Master had absolute control over all of the men on his ship. He was also responsible for everything that happened on his ship. That remains true today.

 

CAPTAIN IN HIS CHAIR

Just doodling. The Captain or Master had absolute control over all of the men on his ship. He was also responsible for everything that happened on his ship. That remains true today.

 

WORKING ALOFT

Just doodling. Keeping the sails in good trim was vital in the days of the sailing ships. Sailors spent much of their time working aloft - climbing around  in the rigging or on the masts.

 

TOP OF THE WORLD

Just doodling.

 

SAILOR RUNNING UP THE SAIL RIGGING

Just doodling

SAILING SHIP OFFICER WITH HIS LONG GLASS

Just doodling

 

 

PINT OF ALE

Just doodling

 

 

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